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QHotels study reveals delegate personality types

QHotels delegate personality types
Delegates attending conferences and events across the UK fall into one of seven distinct personality types, a new study by event experts at QHotels reveals.  
QHotels’ event co-ordinators, who meet thousands of delegates at the group’s 26 hotel venues each year, have the opportunity to witness the behaviour of a wide range of individuals at its events and have identified seven specific personalities, including ‘The Eagers’ and ‘The Social Butterflies’.


Having identified the delegate typologies, QHotels teams have offered some insight into how event organisers can manage the competing needs and demands of the individual personality types, including who to pair them with, how to keep them engaged during presentations and how to ensure they get the most out of group activities.  

Claire Rowland, Director of Marketing at QHotels, said: “This has been a light-hearted study which our event teams have really enjoyed contributing to, but the application of what we’ve learned is more serious.  We know that at any event there can be a wide range of delegate types, each bringing with them different motivations and expectations.  For an event organiser to make their event a success, they have to balance all these competing personality types and their needs.   

“Experienced event organisers will juggle delegate needs almost on instinct, but for anyone new to this role, or who doesn’t organise frequent events, making sure an ‘Edge-of-the-Roomer’ is kept engaged while also giving a ‘Nail-Biter’ the opportunity to get maximum value from the event, can pose quite a challenge.  

“We think people will enjoy trying to work out which typology sounds most like them or their colleagues.  We also believe that certain industries or events will attract greater numbers of particular personality types and look forward to our customers testing this theory out in the events they host with us over the coming months!”  

The seven delegate typologies – which are explained in more detail at QHotels.co.uk/Typologies – are:  
The Eagers – arrive at events extra early and are always the first to volunteer themselves for tasks.
QHotels says: Organisers should ensure other delegates have an opportunity to volunteer and take part in tasks and don’t feel left out. 

The Social Butterflies - the first to spot a networking opportunity and love to use their business cards.  
QHotels says: Allocate plenty of time at the start of a conference for meet and greets, to give Social Butterflies time to build up their bank of contacts.  

The Megaphones - a talkative type that don’t like to miss an opportunity to give their opinions.  
QHotels says: Ask them to take part in various tasks as part of group activities and to listen and engage, as well as voice their opinions.  

The Easy Riders - behave in a very relaxed and calm way and don’t appear to be fazed by anything.  
QHotels says: They will probably need a little nudge to get them involved, so don’t be afraid to prompt them.  

Nail-Biters - often anxious about doing and saying the wrong things at events. They feel unprepared – although they rarely are – so they spend the event fretting.  
QHotels says: They need a helping hand from organisers to give them ongoing reassurance and guidance during an event.  

The Edge-of-the-Roomers - fairly quiet during events and can be recognised by their far-away look. They’re not keen on meeting new people and will disappear during breaks.  
QHotels says: Give them specific tasks or give them a role within the event – such as asking them to mentor a less-experienced attendee.  

The Disruptives - often don’t want to be at events, and they’re not afraid to make it clear!  
QHotels says: Try to find out why they aren’t keen to participate. Help fulfil their needs and go beyond their expectations to turn them into positive delegates!

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