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The Grand Brighton unveils new website for 2015

Luxury seafront hotel, The Grand Brighton, has kicked off 2015 with the launch of its brand new website, redesigned to highlight its exceptional business, events and leisure facilities.
The new website has been designed by Travel Click with a stylish image-lead layout, showing off the opulence of the iconic hotel whilst providing comprehensive details of the available services to attract potential bookers.

The re-launched site has significantly improved functionality, making it easier for users to navigate and is compatible on a number of devices. Pages have been adapted to include detailed information on each of The Grand’s key services including; rooms, dining, meetings and events, weddings, spa and fitness, as well as a regularly updated offers page. 

The launch of the new website continues a new era for the hotel, which began after the property was sold by De Vere Group and bought by a private investor in April 2014. Since the sale, The Grand has gone from strength to strength, having been awarded two AA Rosettes for its seafood restaurant GB1, and the landmark celebration of the hotel’s 150th anniversary last July. 

Andrew Mosley, General Manager at The Grand Brighton, comments: “Previously, our website was an extension of De Vere’s main site, which meant there were stricter rules surrounding branding and content. Now, as an independent hotel, we’ve had the opportunity to be creative with all aspects of the site, giving online visitors a true indication of what we have to offer. Our new website gives our clients an interactive experience that is simple to use and shows off our beautiful accommodation, spa and dining facilities, to show off exactly what makes The Grand so unique.”

The Grand Brighton is an iconic and luxury hotel situated on Brighton’s famous seafront. Designed and built in 1864, the historic hotel is a true example of Italian influence in Victorian architecture.

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