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Marina Bay Sands removes shark fin from menus

Property goes shark fin-free in Sands Expo and own restaurants; procures seafood from sustainable sources

Marina Bay Sands has taken a decisive step in its ongoing commitment to protect the environment by no longer serving shark fin in restaurants it owns and operates. Shark fin dishes are also no longer offered at MICE (meetings, incentives, conventions, exhibitions) events at Sands Expo and Convention Centre.

This initiative, which was piloted in October 2013, is aligned to the integrated resort’s global sustainability strategy – Sands ECO360°, which drives the stewardship of responsible business operations in the areas of green buildings, environmentally responsible operations, green meetings and sustainability education and outreach.

“Removing shark fin from the menus across our different business units is a bold testament to our commitment to reducing our environmental impact. Marina Bay Sands is a leader in the hospitality and MICE industry – we have the unique opportunity to inspire and influence our customers and partners to adopt sustainable practices,” said Kevin Teng, Director of Sustainability at Marina Bay Sands.

"We commend Marina Bay Sands for leading the way given its iconic status in Singapore. Their commitment and now concrete action of removing shark fin from their wholly-owned restaurants and from banquet operations should not be seen as anything but exemplary," said Elaine Tan, CEO of World Wildlife Fund Singapore. "Sharks are a crucial part of marine ecosystems and their populations have a direct impact on fish stocks, which in-turn affects many things, including our food security in the future. Marina Bay Sands is showing foresight and leadership in corporate sustainability, providing a great example that the longevity and ongoing success of business is closely tied to safeguarding the biodiversity of our planet."

As the first venue in Singapore and Southeast Asia to obtain the ISO 20121 Sustainable Events Management Certification, Marina Bay Sands has built in systems and offerings to help its environmentally-conscious clients meet their sustainability goals. On the F&B front, MICE clients can choose from the Green Harvest Menu that features ingredients sourced locally to reduce food miles.

Additionally, selected seafood served at MICE events as well as restaurants owned and operated by the integrated resort are sourced from suppliers that fish or farm responsibly, as certified by either the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) or the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC). Both certifications are global seafood standards used to identify suppliers who meet the highest benchmark for sustainable wild-capture seafood.

Marina Bay Sands is showcasing its sustainable seafood offerings from 8 to 15 June 2014 at its international buffet restaurant, RISE. This is held in conjunction with Singapore’s first Sustainable Seafood Festival organised by WWF. RISE, located at Hotel Tower 1 Lobby, will serve 13 dishes in its special sustainable seafood menu alongside its daily extensive buffet menu. Ranging from salads, soups to entrées, some of the sustainable seafood items include sustainable tilapia, alaskan pollack, pink salmon and atlantic cod.

Last week, Marina Bay Sands’ parent company, Las Vegas Sands (LVS) was named one of the world's most environmentally-friendly companies in Newsweek's annual Green Rankings. LVS holds the 18th spot on the U.S. 500 list, and the 28th position on the Global 500 list.

This accomplishment makes Las Vegas Sands the highest ranked consumer services company in the entire country and the second highest globally.

As part of Marina Bay Sands’ ECO360° strategy, the integrated resort will also work with its tenants to encourage them to adopt sustainable practices, including recycling, reducing food waste and removing shark fin from their menus.

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